Midday Connection

A safe place to process your story.

Archive for the month “December, 2013”

Midday blog: Poem reflection

maryAs we reflect on this holiday season, read this poem by Nicola Slee called “Fiat”. This poem is in the voice of Mary, mother of Jesus:

Fiat

I uttered myself
I claimed my voice
I was not afraid to question
I held my ground
I made my yes
looking straight into the angel’s eyes
(any slave girl could have been beaten or raped for less)
There was no mastery here
Nothing was taken from me
Everything was given
Here I am:
See me
Listen
As you read this poem, reflect:
How do you feel as you read this poem?
What most stood out in the poem?
Why do you suppose this poem is called “Fiat”?
Are you being shown a different perspective? If so, how do you respond to it?
Can you relate to this poem, personally?

Midday blog: Hope

I’ve been reading an Advent devotional this season called “Night Visions” by Jan Richardson.  The first three weeks have been pensive.  It’s been fitting for my frame of mind this season.  This week of Christmas is a week of hope and I’m ready for it!  But, not the “bursting forth in ultimate triumph” kind.  More of the “tiny seed of the beginnings of hope” kind.

This morning, I read in the devotional, “A seed in the ground. A flame in the darkness. A hand outstretched. A child in the womb. Hope starts small and overtakes us, stretching the borders of what we have known.”

As we ease into the Christmas week, I’m thankful for the power of small beginnings of hope – a “yes”, a smile, a friendly touch of a hand.

 

lorineffnewLori Neff is the senior producer for the award-winning national radio program, Midday Connection. Lori grew up in a small town in Ohio, spending more time outside in nature than inside. She is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute. Her interests include art (looking at it and creating it), music, literature, humanitarian aid efforts, cooking, gardening, coffee, traveling, thinking, learning and spending time with her husband.

To learn more about Lori and read her blog, please visit visit her website.

Midday blog: Images Are Important

I love art. I buried that love for years. I thought it was silly, superfluous, unimportant. That, however, is an immature view. Thankfully, I grew up (read still growing up).

This Advent season I learned about an exhibit at the Loyola Museum of Art in Chicago.  Just 5 short blocks from Moody Radio, I walked over one afternoon after work. The exhibit is called Art and Faith of the Crèche and it captivated me.  I took picture after picture of Nativity scenes that spoke to me. The Crèche’s, all from one collection, were procured all over the globe. Beautiful ethnic faces of Mary and Joseph brought these scenes to life for me.

I decided to post a Crèche a day, sometimes two, on my Facebook page. I’ve not only enjoyed seeing the photos on a larger screen that my small iPhone, but I’ve enjoyed the response from so many. A comment from a friend on Facebook put my own thoughts into words. “I’m really enjoying these nativity posts of yours – they are really helping me focus.”  Focus, that does seem to be an issue. My mind rarely stops spinning and swirling. The cell phone buzzes, another text, another news notification. No wonder we find Advent such a hard season. We talk of the impatience of our children. We are no less so. Caught up in the frenzy, even, at times, helping to produce that frenzy.

Here are a few of my favorite Nativities from the exhibit.  Take a deep breath, be still, take time to explore with your eyes the scenes from a variety of cultures and contexts.

This is from Ghana.

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This is from Albania

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This is from Bolivia

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This is from Poland

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This is from Vietnam

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This is from Ecuador

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This is from Haiti

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This is from Alaska

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Guest blog: For a Sad Advent

There is so much brokenness. My brain is on overdrive, filled with stories. The pain of the people dear to me is a loud white noise in my head, keeping me awake at night. The idea of Advent being a time for introspection and penitence is still true, but it doesn’t fit this year. This year I can’t “God’s sovereignty!” myself out of the questions I carry, all balled up in my pocket.

Now that I have wept, now that I have grieved, now that I have lost, now that I have learned to hold space with and for the ones who are hurting, now I have a place for Advent. Now that I have fallen in step with the man from Nazareth, I want to walk where he walked into the brokenness of this life, and see the Kingdom of God at hand. Now that I have learned how much I need him, I have learned to watch for him.

Advent is perhaps for the ones who know longing.

Advent, the messy season of the soul at its most human and most holy — when we don’t know what’s coming, we don’t know what we need, and we’re waiting and getting so antsy for something to change that we half don’t care what it is.

Some days I don’t know if I believe, or if I do, what I know. But it’s human to hope, and it’s Christian to hope, and the messianic impulse of expectancy is strong. Things can get better. Things should get better. Love is real, and it is healing. The Incarnation is mystifying and surprising and good and I expect no less of final redemption. I don’t want a bow. I want a minor chord, I want the slice of surprise of the unresolved, the unknown. It’s more true.

(read the full post here: http://wineandmarble.com/advent-a-venir/)

Midday blog: Becoming More Human, Less Machine

This poem by Carol Bieleck is a piece of beautifully written layers, and for me, it describes that shocking evolution – when everyday life becomes everyday overwhelmed-ness, and the recognition that this is the new normal. It resonated with my own new normal. And then, that lovely invitation to accept what is and then to learn to breathe under water.

So, for starters, that means I’m taking some days of vacation this month (no school work or housework or people-serving allowed!) and engaging in what my executive coach calls soul care days.

I can’t wait..to spend time with me again. To become more human and less machine.

House by the Sea by Carol Bieleck

I built my house by the sea.
Not on sand, mind you.
Not on the shifting sand.
And I built it of rock.
A strong house.
By a strong sea.
And we got well-acquainted, the sea and I.
Good neighbors.
Not that we spoke much.
We met in silences.
Respectful, keeping our distance,
but looking our thoughts across the fence
of sand.
Always, the fence of sand our barrier;
always the sand between.
And then one day
(I still don’t know how it happened),
but the sea came.
Without warning.
Without welcome, even.
Not sudden and swift, but sifting across the
sand like wine.
Less like the flow of water than the flow
of blood.
Slow, but coming.
Slow, but flowing like an open wound.
And I thought of flight and I thought of drowning and I thought of death.
And while I thought the sea crept higher,
till it reached my door.
I knew, then, there was neither flight nor
death nor drowning.
That when the sea comes calling you stop
being good neighbors,
Well-acquainted, friendly-from-a-distance
neighbors.
And you give your house for a coral castle,
And you learn to breathe under water.

 

Melinda Schmidt

Melinda Schmidt is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute and holds a Broadcasting/Bible degree from Calvary Bible College. She has served with Moody Radio since 1980 in various hosting capacities. Married with two young adult children, Melinda lives outside Chicago, loves reading, developing her creative interests and hopes to be a life-long learner. Twitter: @melindaschmidt

Midday blog: Changes

Today I start a new job. A little over eight years ago I walked onto Moody’s campus as a young freshman student excited, and a little nervous, to start this new chapter of my life—and some of those same feelings are with me today. While I was a student at Moody I had to opportunity to start working part-time for Moody Radio, a job that about a year and a half after graduating became a full-time job. I have worn many hats and worked on many different programs while at Moody, but a majority of my time has been spent with the ever lovely Midday ladies.

I’ve learned a lot and have made many memories over these past three and a half years of working on Midday Connection. I could tell you which Midday lady burps the loudest (but I won’t).  I’ll never forget the day Anita halted the program to kill a spider in the studio. I’m sure Anita, Melinda, and Lori won’t miss me bugging them to adjust their microphones. I’ll miss coming in to work to find that Lori has decided to re-arrange her office yet again…and deciding to re-arrange Anita and Melinda’s office while Anita is off on vacation. There are many other fun memories and bits of knowledge that I could mention and yet they just might get me in trouble so I’ll leave it there.  🙂

The past couple of months have been steadily marking out that this is a period of transition and the start of a new chapter in my life. I have started dating and have an amazing girlfriend. I have turned in the initial draft, defense draft, and final draft of my master’s thesis and will be walking down an aisle and receiving a diploma and academic hood this month. Finally, I unexpectedly went through the interview process for a new job and was offered that job. I’ve enjoyed spending this previous chapter of my life y’all, and who knows, maybe I’ll run into you in this chapter or in a future chapter.

Honestly, I’m not sure how to best end this post, so I’ll just sign off with the infamous words of Truman from the movie The Truman Show. “Good morning, and if I don’t see you, good afternoon, good evening, and good night”

Josh Klos is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Radio Communications, he served as the engineer for Midday Connection from 2010 to Novemer 2013. He is also a part of the volunteer College & 20’s group staff at his church and enjoys spending time outside, as well as at libraries, bookstores and various coffee shops.

To learn more about Josh and read his blog, please visit his website.

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