Midday Connection

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Archive for the category “Josh Klos”

Midday blog: Changes

Today I start a new job. A little over eight years ago I walked onto Moody’s campus as a young freshman student excited, and a little nervous, to start this new chapter of my life—and some of those same feelings are with me today. While I was a student at Moody I had to opportunity to start working part-time for Moody Radio, a job that about a year and a half after graduating became a full-time job. I have worn many hats and worked on many different programs while at Moody, but a majority of my time has been spent with the ever lovely Midday ladies.

I’ve learned a lot and have made many memories over these past three and a half years of working on Midday Connection. I could tell you which Midday lady burps the loudest (but I won’t).  I’ll never forget the day Anita halted the program to kill a spider in the studio. I’m sure Anita, Melinda, and Lori won’t miss me bugging them to adjust their microphones. I’ll miss coming in to work to find that Lori has decided to re-arrange her office yet again…and deciding to re-arrange Anita and Melinda’s office while Anita is off on vacation. There are many other fun memories and bits of knowledge that I could mention and yet they just might get me in trouble so I’ll leave it there.  🙂

The past couple of months have been steadily marking out that this is a period of transition and the start of a new chapter in my life. I have started dating and have an amazing girlfriend. I have turned in the initial draft, defense draft, and final draft of my master’s thesis and will be walking down an aisle and receiving a diploma and academic hood this month. Finally, I unexpectedly went through the interview process for a new job and was offered that job. I’ve enjoyed spending this previous chapter of my life y’all, and who knows, maybe I’ll run into you in this chapter or in a future chapter.

Honestly, I’m not sure how to best end this post, so I’ll just sign off with the infamous words of Truman from the movie The Truman Show. “Good morning, and if I don’t see you, good afternoon, good evening, and good night”

Josh Klos is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Radio Communications, he served as the engineer for Midday Connection from 2010 to Novemer 2013. He is also a part of the volunteer College & 20’s group staff at his church and enjoys spending time outside, as well as at libraries, bookstores and various coffee shops.

To learn more about Josh and read his blog, please visit his website.

Midday blog: In Defense of Science Fiction

One of my favorite science fiction books, Ender’s Game, was released as a movie this weekend. I thought in honor of that release I would repost this week my first post on the Midday Connection blog. Also, Ender’s Game was a pretty good adaptation of the book, especially given the limitations that movies have, I enjoyed seeing it and would recommend it.

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You may remember when I was recently on the Millrose Club and I mentioned the book Ender’s Game and that there were aliens in the book. There was a negative reaction to “aliens”* – so I am here to defend science fiction! Or at least hopefully give you some reasons why it should not be a genre we neglect. First, here is a definition of the science fiction that I found helpful.

To be science fiction, not fantasy, an honest effort at prophetic extrapolation from the known must be made.

– John W. Campbell

So, science fiction doesn’t necessarily mean aliens (although it doesn’t rule them out either). In fact many widely read books would fall into the genre of science fiction, such as Fahrenheit 451 and more recently The Hunger Games.

Why read science fiction? The first reason is that it can provide a prophetic warning, we see this with both 1984 and Brave New World and in fact have seen many parallels between Brave New World and our own world. As we look at the many bioethical issues facing the world today, and that we’ll face in the near future good science fiction can help the reader to better understand some of the issues and implications.

Another reason to read science fiction is because of the change in setting. By removing the reader from their current world the author is able to help the reader see issues and interact with ideas that they might normally think about, or to think about them in new ways. For example, The Hunger Games trilogy explores issues of power and makes assertions about what power does (whether those assertions are right or not the reader must decide for herself).

I hope that these two reasons help you to see more value in science fiction. And if you’re interest is piqued, here are some books to check out**

Ender’s Game – Orson Scott Card

Space Trilogy – C.S. Lewis

Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury

His Majesty’s Starship – Ben Jeapes

The Foundation Trilogy – Isaac Asimov

The Hunger Games Trilogy – Suzanne Collins

*I’m sure the Anita, Melinda and Lori were just joking around…right?  🙂

**Note, not all of these books are written from a Christian perspective. But they all present ideas that are worth wrestling with, whether you agree with what the author says or not.

Josh Klos is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Radio Communications, he has served as the engineer for Midday Connection since 2010. He is also a part of the volunteer College & 20’s group staff at his church and enjoys spending time outside, as well as at libraries, bookstores and various coffee shops. He’s busy these days with graduate school, where he studying communication and culture.

To learn more about Josh and read his blog, please visit his website.

Midday blog: A Thoroughly Unexpected Conversation

“To take the train you have to be a people person”

I overheard these words while riding the elevated train system in Chicago (affectionately known simply as the El). The speaker of these words continued on to talk about how the train was “her car.” It got her everywhere she needed to go. Somehow the conversation quickly morphed into tithing. This lady and her friend were going on about how crazy it was that some people in church don’t tithe.

“It’s 10 cents out of every dollar, it’s not that much!”

What I then heard was these two ladies discussing how God had been faithful in their lives. Neither one has a lot of money, but they do what they can to support themselves, and give faithfully to God. In return they have seen His faithfulness to them…once again though the conversation took an unexpected turn, at least for me.

They started talking about God’s faithfulness in providing for medical expenses. One of the ladies expressed how thankful she was for the “Affordable Care Act” (also often referred to as Obamacare) which from her perspective was God being faithful in taking care of her. Suddenly I was experiencing a communications concept called “perspective taking.” I was seeing a controversial issue through a different perspective, and I could understand that perspective.

It made me slow down and wonder, how many issues, or more importantly people, do I think I understand and yet there are important perspectives I have yet to consider. I may not change my stance on an issue, but then again maybe I will. It makes me more prayerful as I consider what I think I know. Lord, may I have the humility to hold my positions loosely and be willing to be wrong.

What about you? Has anything happened recently to make you reconsider a position that you hold?

Josh Klos is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Radio Communications, he has served as the engineer for Midday Connection since 2010. He is also a part of the volunteer College & 20’s group staff at his church and enjoys spending time outside, as well as at libraries, bookstores and various coffee shops. He’s busy these days with graduate school, where he studying communication and culture.

To learn more about Josh and read his blog, please visit his website.

Midday blog: Radically Inefficient

I’ve been thinking a lot about efficiency recently. In fact, I even posed the question on Twitter, “Is efficiency a Christian value?”

French thinker Jacques Ellul was not so enthralled with efficiency, which according to Ellul efficiency is a primary value promoted by technology. For Ellul the results of efficiency “perhaps would have meaning if man were merely an animal, but which have no conclusive Significance if man is something more than a production machine” (Technological Society, 110).

However we live in a culture where efficiency has come to rule. For me the jury is still out on what kind of value we should place on efficiency, but here’s what I do know: We certainly have elevated efficiency to an idolatrous place in much of our culture. I don’t believe that being efficient is bad in and of itself…but we should ask ourselves, to what end are we practicing efficiency? And do we miss something when we focus too much on efficiency? As much as I like the speed and ease of a microwaved meal, there’s also something about making a meal from scratch (or at least actually having to use the oven).

As for me, I’m thinking I may try radical inefficiency. No, I’m not going to sleep on the job or anything like that. But I am trying to reevaluate the things that I do, and to not put pressure on myself to get so much done. This does mean letting some things fall to the wayside, but that’s ok. Every minute of every day I don’t have to be “productive” rather I can leave time to just be…

As Ellul noted, we are more than production machines. At our core, we are relational beings, and relationships simply aren’t efficient. Life often is not efficient. We are called to more than efficiency.

What about you? What do you think of our culture’s perspective on efficiency? Have you exhausted yourself by always trying to be productive and efficient?

Josh Klos is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Radio Communications, he has served as the engineer for Midday Connection since 2010. He is also a part of the volunteer College & 20’s group staff at his church and enjoys spending time outside, as well as at libraries, bookstores and various coffee shops. He’s busy these days with graduate school, where he studying communication and culture.

To learn more about Josh and read his blog, please visit his website.

Midday blog: As Paul Harvey Would Say…

I thought I knew the story of The Odyssey. In junior high I had a period where I was obsessed with learning as much as I could about Greek and Roman mythology, the stories and heroics captured my imagination. Of course one of the great stories is that of Odysseus making his way home after the fall of Troy. I read (and listened) to several different retellings of the story. And so, I thought I knew the story of The Odyssey.

My book club decided that we would read The Odyssey for our next selection. As I’ve started to read I’ve realized, I do not know this story at all. As a reader I haven’t even gotten to the title character, all of the narrative so far has been concerned with the son of Odysseus, Telemachus. There’s always more to a story than we realize isn’t there? I remember first coming across this idea when I went to see the musical Wicked.* Maybe The Wizard of Oz didn’t tell us the whole story (then again, maybe it did). I also was reminded of this idea when I read the book The Drama of Scripture. I thought I knew the basic storyline of scripture but it’s actually greater than I had imagined, and I learned more about my own story that way.

Yet I think one of the greatest takeaways for me is that: everyone has a story. I might assume I already know someone’s story, but I don’t really know their story (and them) until I take the time to get to know that person well. I can assume I know someone’s motives, but in reality there is a complex history and scars and life circumstances leading to the decisions that someone else might make.

So before I jump to conclusions, I need to take a lesson from Paul Harvey, and wait to hear “The rest of the story…”

*While I love and heartily recommend the musical Wicked I cannot recommend the book Wicked by Gregory Maguire. I read it found it to quite possibly be the worst book (in terms of story, as well as the amount and explicitness of sexual content) I’ve ever read.

Josh Klos is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Radio Communications, he has served as the engineer for Midday Connection since 2010. He is also a part of the volunteer College & 20’s group staff at his church and enjoys spending time outside, as well as at libraries, bookstores and various coffee shops. He’s busy these days with graduate school, where he studying communication and culture.

To learn more about Josh and read his blog, please visit his website.

Midday blog: Groaning

I get to be “Debbie Downer” after Lori’s post on fun last week. I’ve been thinking a lot lately about some of the tragedy, death, and grief in the world lately. There was the Asiana plane crash recently, and the same weekend a train derailed in Canada killing 50. On Sunday I was driving to church when my ears perked up as I heard a news story come on. Cory Monteith, a cast member on the TV show Glee, had been found dead in his hotel room, at the age of 31. Someone only six years older than me dead…as I write this post, the reasons for his death are unknown. I think also of a friend of mine from college. I just found out last week that her two-year-old daughter has cancer…and it’s stage 4. I think of the little 3-year-old boy in my church who is coming up on the one year anniversary of his cancer diagnosis, and his future is still uncertain.

It is easy to get overwhelmed by the suffering in this world. I think of the Apostle Paul as he talks about creation groaning under the weight of sin, and in anticipation of the hope that is to come. I realize that I too, along with creation, must look to the hope that is to come. It also makes me want to cherish these moments, especially the good ones, and the glimpses of God’s grace that come during the bad moments. My hope cannot be in what I can see, but rests in Him who is unseen. Him who is sovereign over all creation, and who will take the time to acknowledge and gently wipe away all my tears.

Josh Klos is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Radio Communications, he has served as the engineer for Midday Connection since 2010. He is also a part of the volunteer College & 20’s group staff at his church and enjoys spending time outside, as well as at libraries, bookstores and various coffee shops. He’s busy these days with graduate school, where he studying communication and culture.

To learn more about Josh and read his blog, please visit his website.

Midday blog: OK with Ordinary

We’re in the part of the church calendar that’s referred to as “Ordinary Time.” This is the time of year where we primarily live the ordinary Christian life. I’ve been thinking about ordinariness a lot lately. With books like Radical and Crazy Love calling us to live lives that are different, I’ve wondered what the Christian life looks like for the “average” Christian. I’ve come to the conclusion that I’m ok with ordinary. Ordinary for the Christian will look different than for the non-Christian, yet I believe that there are some similarities. The extraordinary aspects of our lives, I believe, is demonstrated in our love for one another and how that love is exhibited.

Paul provides encouragement towards this kind of life in 1 Thessalonians where he says “Now concerning brotherly love you have no need for anyone to write to you, for you yourselves have been taught by God to love one another, for that indeed is what you are doing to all the brothers throughout Macedonia. But we urge you brothers, to do this more and more, and to aspire to live quietly, and to mind your own affairs, and to work with your hands, as we instructed you, so that you may walk properly before outsiders and be dependent on no one.” (4:9-12)

Josh Klos is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Radio Communications, he has served as the engineer for Midday Connection since 2010. He is also a part of the volunteer College & 20’s group staff at his church and enjoys spending time outside, as well as at libraries, bookstores and various coffee shops. He’s busy these days with graduate school, where he studying communication and culture.

To learn more about Josh and read his blog, please visit his website.

Midday blog: Crossing to Safety

Recently I finished reading Crossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner. It’s a book about ordinary people. There are two couples (Sid & Charity, Larry & Sally) who form a friendship. At first the friendship seems anything but ordinary as it’s the type where they all instantly click and are great friends with each other. The book follows these two couples as they live their ordinary lives, which have their ups and downs like any life.

I’ve spent a fair amount of time lately thinking about this book, there are references throughout the book questioning who would want to read about ordinary people. However the book realizes that there is a beauty to lives that are lived well. Even in the midst of great difficulty and tragedy, there is a simple life that can be lived well. Even when the specter of death looms, and we have to wrestle with it, we are to still celebrate a life well lived.

Larry, Sid, Sally, and Charity are not perfect people by any stretch of the imagination, but they do reflect us back to ourselves and make us wrestle with what kind of life are we going to live? What truth will be reflected at the end of our story? And as I contemplate this book, I realize perhaps there friendship which seems unusual may be a little more ordinary than I thought as I consider the depth of some of the friendships that I have.

How about you? Do you see the ordinary life as a blessing, or something to run away from?

Josh Klos is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Radio Communications, he has served as the engineer for Midday Connection since 2010. He is also a part of the volunteer College & 20’s group staff at his church and enjoys spending time outside, as well as at libraries, bookstores and various coffee shops. He’s busy these days with graduate school, where he studying communication and culture.

To learn more about Josh and read his blog, please visit his website.

 

Midday blog: Walking Together

“Oh how good it is

On this journey we share

To rejoice with the happy

And weep with those who mourn.”

I fought back tears as I sang those words, surrounded by the congregation at my church. The words were taking on new meaning for me. I hadn’t received any emails, text messages, calls, no updates of any kind…I was fairly certain of what was coming.

My grandfather had been admitted to the hospital less than 48 hours earlier, and since that time I had received regular updates on how he was doing. Things did not look good, and the last updated I had received on Saturday said, “Not a lot is different.” At Christmas I had talked with my mom, we were wondering if my grandfather’s health had started a downhill slide, and now we had an answer, his healthiest days were behind him.

After the service, I talked with friends as if everything was normal, but I knew that things were not. I said goodbye to my friends, and as I was preparing to leave the church parking lot, I got the call. My mom was on the other end of the phone line; my grandfather had passed away earlier that morning. I cried there in my car. Then I texted my friends and told them that I had changed my mind; I would join them for lunch. I knew that while my inclination might be to go off by myself, I needed other people to walk alongside, and that I had people who I knew would walk alongside me during this time. At lunch, my closest friends protected me from the larger crowd of friends who were out eating lunch together. They took care of me, gave me hugs, and sat with me. A friend who had recently lost her grandfather gave me a hug and simply said, “I’m sorry friend.”

So why am I telling you all this? Because the words that start off this post are true. We need to be people who are there in both the good times and the bad. And we need those who will be with us in the good times and bad. God designed us to be a diverse, and yet whole community. I know that community is lacking for many people…but I would encourage you, that it is worth whatever the cost to build that community of fellow believers, for as the movie my friends and I went and saw that afternoon reminded us, “To love another person is to see the face of God.” We are God’s ambassadors, messengers, outworking in each other’s lives here on this earth.

So thank you. Thank you Aaron, Natalie, Jonathan, Kirsten, and David. Thank you for walking beside me, both then and now.

Josh Klos is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Radio Communications, he has served as the engineer for Midday Connection since 2010. He is also a part of the volunteer College & 20’s group staff at his church and enjoys spending time outside, as well as at libraries, bookstores and various coffee shops. He’s busy these days with graduate school, where he studying communication and culture.

To learn more about Josh and read his blog, please visit his website.

Midday blog: Sitting in Darkness

This Friday I will end up sitting in the dark for a while. My church does a tenebrae style service for Good Friday. For those unfamiliar with this style, it slowly gets darker throughout the service as candles are extinguished, until at the end the sanctuary is in complete darkness.

Going to Good Friday services was not something that I experienced growing up, however I have grown to appreciate in recent years the role that a Good Friday service plays in the liturgical calendar. We seem to often skim over the fact that Christ died as we rush toward His resurrection. Stop and think about that, the son of God…the creator of the world…died. This was a real death, and so I’ve learned that by celebrating “Passion Week” in more of it’s fullness, I understand that better.

This Friday I will end up sitting in darkness, a period to reflect on the death of Christ, and to mourn His death. Part of mourning His death involves reflecting on the reason that it was necessary. Sitting with the gravity and weight of this event is important. It makes the light that is coming on Sunday morning that much more joyful. There is a day though in-between Friday and Sunday, and I try to make a point of continuing to focus on remembering Christ’s death on Saturday as well because Easter is not here yet…it’s coming, the light is starting to break through.

This is a time when we can also look forward to our eternal hope, right now much of our world is still shrouded in darkness…but we can see cracks of light breaking through and in the end, we will live in a world that is encompassed in light. In the meantime we must be the light of the world. So while we sit in the darkness, let us contemplate Christ, the great cost that he paid, and look for those points of light.

As one song I appreciate puts it:

Deep in the darkest night,

when there’s no spark of hope,

we must be points of light

piercing the darkness.

Bright as the dazzling stars

in an indifferent sky

and in our cruelest hour when hope is gone,

we’ll raise our heads

and we’ll journey on.

Josh Klos is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Radio Communications, he has served as the engineer for Midday Connection since 2010. He is also a part of the volunteer College & 20’s group staff at his church and enjoys spending time outside, as well as at libraries, bookstores and various coffee shops. He’s busy these days with graduate school, where he studying communication and culture.

To learn more about Josh and read his blog, please visit his website.

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